In vivo quantification of tau can be performed using tau-PET (PET: positron emission tomography). Tau-PET binds to insoluble neurofibrillary tangles, another core pathological feature of AD. Six stages that characterize tau pathology have been established through post-mortem studies1,2 and PET brain imaging.3 This illustration represents the stages of tau pathology measured by PET. Early stages are often accompanied by mild memory dysfunction; middle stages are accompanied by mild cognitive impairment; later stages are observed in individuals with AD dementia.

The figure is reprinted from Therriault J, et al. Nat Aging 2022;2(6):565–535. The content is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

file_download Download in HQ

Related content

image Image The pathology of ischaemic stroke is complex, but commonly involves the formation of a clot that travels in the blood to or within the brain and becomes lodged in the blood vessels of the brain (a thromboembolism), which can reduce or block blood flow (an occlusion).
Pathology of Ischaemic Stroke

The pathology of ischaemic stroke is complex, but commonly involves the formation of a clot that travels in the blood to or within the brain and becomes lodged in the blood vessels of the brain (a thromboembolism), which can reduce or block blood flow (an occlusion).

22.04.2024 Neurobehavioral Consequences of Stroke
image Image Post-stroke neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) - Fatigue
Post-stroke Neuropsychiatric Symptoms (NPS) – Fatigue

Post-stroke fatigue is an under-recognized NPS, which healthcare professionals should anticipate in patients.

22.04.2024 Neurobehavioral Consequences of Stroke
image Image Brain circuitry and emotional lability
Brain Circuitry and Emotional Lability

Emotional lability describes episodes of involuntary and uncontrollable crying and/or laughing, outside of socially appropriate circumstances and when it is incongruent with the patient’s emotional state.

22.04.2024 Neurobehavioral Consequences of Stroke